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DR. JEFFREY SEINFELD MEMORIAL     PSYCHOANALYTIC LICENSE     MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS  NEURO-PSYCHO-EDUCATION

2016 ORI’s Annual Conference

 Co-sponsored by St. John’s University’s Psychology Department and the Office of Postgraduate Professional Development Programs

Topic: Women's Voices in Psychoanalysis: Erased or Forgotten

Date & time: Saturday, March 19th, 2016 (9:15 am - 4:30 pm)

 

Presenters: Jeffrey Lewis, PhD and B. William Brennan, ThM, MA, LMHC

Discussant: Eva Papiasvili, PhD, ABPP

Moderator: Susan Kavaler-Adler, PhD, ABPP, NCPsyA, D.Litt

Location: St. John’s University, Manhattan Campus, 101 Astor Place, NYC, 10003

  This program is Approved by the National Association of Social Workers (Approval # 886726323-0) for 6 Social Work (NYS) Continuing Education contact hours. Other professionals - earn 6.0 CE post-graduate education credits in psychoanalytic education.

To register, follow the link HERE.

This full day conference will put a highlight on lives and contributions to psychoanalysis by women who were “erased or forgotten”: Sabina Spielrein, Izette de Forest, Elizabeth Severn, Clara Thompson, Alice Balint, and Enid Balint.

Everything faded into mist. The past was erased, the erasure was forgotten, the lie became truth.  (George Orwell)

Psychoanalytic theory and practice was originated and advanced by men. To say that psychoanalysis was male-centric would be an understatement. From Freud’s original work to the Wednesday Psychological Society, women had only a faint voice in the early psychoanalytic movement. However, as the 20th century progressed so did the presence of women in psychoanalysis.  Theorist/clinicians such as Anna Freud,  Melanie Klein, Karen Horney, Hanna Segal, Helene Deutsch, Joyce McDougal, to name a few, had begun to make significant  and enduring contributions, garnering their share of notoriety, respect and recognition, challenging the male dominated establishment. 

When we move beyond the women mentioned above, the voices of the early psychoanalytic contributors become even more remote and faint. If one was to ask, “Who was Sabina Spielrein?” – the best answer will be mostly based on Sabina’s story of her time as a patient of Carl Jung, who he treated for  hysteria, who later became infamously known as Carl Jung’s lover.  But her story does not end there; following her time with both Jung and Freud, she too became an analyst, and also an original thinker in this new field.  Very few will know that Sabina Spielrein was the first one who proposed the idea of the duality of instinctual life, represented in the life and death instincts, which was incorporated by Sigmund Freud, and given a credit in his Beyond the Pleasure Principle. It was Sabina who discussed with Melanie Klein her interest in child development and the importance of early oral feeding (sucking), and the mother’s breast; and she was the first female who had presented a psychoanalytic paper for the doctorate degree, and promoted psychoanalytic thought in Russia, adding that she was a pioneer in the treatment of children in a “psychoanalytic nursery”, until Stalin banned psychoanalysis all together.

Similarly, if one is asked about Izette de Forest, Elizabeth Severn, or even Clara Thompson (who was considered to be Ferenczi’s American protégé) – it will usually take a “Ferenzian” to tell you that – besides being “Ett.,” “R.N.,” and “Dm.” in Ferenczi’s Clinical Diary – these women had contributed significantly to Ferenczi’s revolutionary clinical armamentarium of "relaxation", "elastic",  and "active" techniques, as well as his “mutual analysis” therapeutic experiment; and increased empathy in working with trauma, something that prior psychoanalytic tradition did not consider to prioritize, but what is on the top of the list in the context of the contemporary psychoanalytic thinking worldwide.

This conference aims to reach further into the historical record and bring long overdue recognition to the incredibly influential female voices in the formative phase of psychoanalysis, much of whom were discarded, marginalized, or forgotten (perhaps repressed) from the narrative of the psychoanalytic movement.   Our distinguished speakers will include: Jeffrey Lewis, PhD (representing the voice of Sabina Spielrein); B. William Brennan, ThM, MA, LMHC (representing the voices of “Ferenczi’s women,” Izette de Forest, Elizabeth Severn, and Clara Thompson); and Eva Papiasvili, PhD, ABPP (our discussant, who also will bring to light the contributions to psychoanalysis of two wives of Michael Balint, Alice and Enid Balint). We will dedicate a significant part of this conference to the panel discussion and to questions and answers between the presenters and the attendees. Let their voices be heard!

During the lunch break, we are planning another educational activity, related to ORI Academic Press book signing event. Further information is below (this activity is awarded 1 CE hour/ credit).

Educational Objectives of this conference:

To examine and discuss a biographical overview of the life and work of Sabina Spielrein and her contributions to psychoanalytic theory (death/ destruction instinct as the main force of “coming into being,” “collective unconscious,” as well as the importance of sucking and the perception of the mother’s breast in child’s development).

To examine and discuss a biographical overview of the life and work of Izette de Forest and Ferenczi’s “active technique” phase.

To contrast the differences between Clara Thompson’s and Elizabeth Severn’s experience of their analysis during Ferenczi’s “relaxation technique.”

To assess theoretical and clinical utility of early relational psychodynamic work of Alice Balint and Enid Balint, the two wives of Michael Balint.

To discuss the contributions of “erased and forgotten” female voices in psychoanalysis, especially in cases of traumatized patients.

To explore the political, social and cultural factors which have contributed to the voices of the early women psychoanalysts being lost or erased.

To explore and discuss the importance of trans-disciplinary and "lay people" contributions to clinical work.

Learning points:

At the end of this conference, the participants will be able to:

Analyze the contributions of Sabina Spielrein to psychoanalytic theory, which were developed further on by Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and Melanie Klein: death/ destruction instinct as the main force of “coming into being,” “collective unconscious,” as well as the importance of sucking and the perception of the mother’s breast in child’s development.

Analyze the life and work of Izette de Forest and her contribution to Ferenczi’s “active technique” phase.

Show understanding and contrast the differences between Clara Thompson’s and Elizabeth Severn’s experience of their analysis during Ferenczi’s “relaxation technique.”

Compare theoretical and clinical contributions of female analysts trained by Sandor Ferenczi and Carl Jung.

Assess theoretical and clinical utility of early relational psychodynamic work of Alice Balint and Enid Balint, the two wives of Michael Balint.

Discuss and analyze the contributions of “erased and forgotten” female voices in psychoanalysis, especially in cases of traumatized patients.

Discuss examples of clinical utilization of modified versions of “active technique” and “elastic technique,” and identify the diagnostic need for such technical alterations, especially in cases of traumatized patients.

Discuss the political, social and cultural factors which have contributed to the voices of the early women psychoanalysts being lost or erased.

Discuss examples of contributions to psychoanalysis and to mental health care by "lay people" voices.

Analyze the importance of bottom-up approach in understanding deep psychoanalytic concepts of Oedipal phenomena, empathy, vicarious trauma.

Bios of the Presenters:

   Jeffrey Lewis, PhD is a clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst in private practice for 30 years. He is a Ferenczi scholar, a reviewer for the American Journal of Psychoanalysis, and the faculty & Board of Directors member of the Object Relations Institute, as well as he had served as the Graduate Clinical Psychology Program faculty member at St. John’s University, for 25 years.

  B. William Brennan ThM, MA, LMHC, is a psychoanalyst in independent practice in Providence, Rhode Island. He is a graduate of the National Training Program of the National Institute of the Psychotherapies and is the Co-chair of the History of Psychoanalysis Committee of the International Forum of Psychoanalytic Education. As a psychoanalytic historian he has written on the identities of the patients in Ferenczi’s Clinical Diary, including Izette de Forest and Clara Thompson.

   Eva D. Papiasvili, Ph.D., ABPP  has been a Supervisor in the Doctoral program of Clinical Psychology at Columbia University in New York, for the past 30 years. She is the past Executive Director and Dean of the Institute of the Postgraduate Psychoanalytic Society where she has been a Training and Supervising Analyst since 1996; Teaching and Supervising Faculty, Object Relations Institute; Founder and Chair of the Psychoanalysis, Art and Creativity, www.psychartcreativity.org, an Affiliate of the International Association for the Arts and Psychology; Editorial Board member of the International Journal for Group Psychotherapy; a Guest Editor and Reader for the International Forum for Psychoanalysis and for the Psychoanalytic Inquiry. In 2014, she has been appointed a Co-Chair for North America of the IPA Encyclopedic Dictionary of Psychoanalysis Task Force.

Conference schedule:

09:15 – 10:00 am – Registration; coffee & breakfast

10:00 – 10:15 am – Introduction (Susan Kavaler-Adler, Phd, ABPP)

10:15 – 11:30 am – Sabina Spielrein (Jeff Lewis, PhD)

11:30 – 11:40 am – Short break

11:40 – 12:50 pm – Elizabeth Severn, Izette Forest, and Clara Thompson (Willim B. Brennan, ThM, MA, LMHC).

12:50 – 02:00pm – Lunch/ Book signing event of the ORI Academic Press - see information below.

02:00 – 03:15 pm – Alice and Enid Balint, and overall Discussion (Eva Papiasvili, PhD, ABPP)

03:15 – 03:30 pm – Short break

03:30 – 04:30 pm – Q&A - Panel

Information about the lunch break event, 01:00 - 2:15 pm:

Book signing @ ORI Academic Press

  The Root Is Bitter, The Root Is Sweet: In the Shadow of Madness, A Memoir – by Dolores Brendon

  Oedipal Paradigms in Collision: An Emendation of a Piece of Freudian Canon – by Dr. Howard H. Covitz

DON'T MISS: Sandra Indig's art work, entitled IMAGES OF WOMEN ! The following paintings will be included in this exhibition:

Jewels - series of three, acrylic on canvas, 48”x 42”

         a. Blue Sapphire, b. Red Ruby, c. Green Emerald

Conjurerer, acrylic on archival paper, 3-“x24”

Restraint, acrylic on archival paper, 24”x19”

Release, acrylic on archival paper, 24”x19”

For more information on the artist and her work: www.sindig.com

Fees and Registration:

____ Early Bird registration (before January 30th, 2016) - $95 regular/ $45 students

____ Pre-registration discount (January 30th – February 28th, 2016) - $105 regular/ $55 students

____ Registration after February 28th, 2016 - $125 regular/ $75 students

____ Registration at the door - $135 regular/ $85 students

Special scholarships for undergraduate/graduate students, retired SW practitioners, as well as for group registration, are available. Inquire by email to Admin@ORINYC.org or at 646-522-1056.

To register: E-mail: admin@orinyc.org  or Fax your request @ (718) 785-3270;  Call 646-522-1056 (ORI administrator). Or, please, send your registration forms and payment (checks and money orders only) to: ORI Administrator; 75-15 187 Street; Fresh Meadows, NY, 11366-1725. Cash is only accepted at the door. Credit cards / PayPal payments are accepted - see below.

 

Certificates for post-graduate training in psychoanalysis and/or psychoanalytic psychotherapy (6.0 hrs) will be available, as per request. Please request them at the time of registration. FYI: Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis is chartered by NYS Department of Education to provide post-graduate training in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. Credits for post-graduate educational activities issued by the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis are accepted by most of professional licensing institutions through USA and overseas. However, some specific continuing/ post-graduate education requirements can be determined by various licensing boards, and if you are planning to use the credits for your license renewal, please check with your licensing board.

Re: CEU certificates for NYS Social Workers: This activity is approved by the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) for 6.0 contact Continuing Ed hours for SW in most of the states, incl. NYS.  Approval # 886726323-0.

Conference Chair overseeing this process: Audrey Ashendorf, LCSW, who also serves as ORI Chair of Admissions, as well as member of the Training Committee.

Note for those who are  requesting CEUs for SW:

NASW requires to have the sign-in lists for all parts of the conference that you'd like to claim CEUs for, plus to fill out and hand in the conference evaluation form by the end of the conference (or mail the evaluations - in this case, the certificate will be mailed to you too). Fees for CEU certificates: $20/ certificate for practitioners; $10/ certificate for students.

Cancellation Policy

Refund in full is offered for cancellations made before March 19th, 2016. No refunds for cancellations made on or after March 19th, 2016 (but credit can be applied for any of the workshops offered at ORI in 2016).

You can pay via PayPal (www.paypal.com); our ID/ handle is: adminorinyc@gmail.com). To use the credit card, you also can just follow the link: Paypal.me/ORINYC .

 
PayPal Acceptance Mark

Read more about the women's voices in psychoanalysis on the following web site:

Britain: http://www.psychoanalytikerinnen.de/greatbritain_biographies.html

Russia (incl. Sabina Spielrein): http://www.psychoanalytikerinnen.de/russland_biografien.html

The Soul Keeper (the movie)

In 1905 a nineteen-year-old girl is admitted into a psychiatric hospital in Zurich where she has arrived from Russia in a desperate condition. The girl is suffering from a severe form of hysteria and refuses to eat. A young doctor, Carl Gustav Jung, takes her under his care and, for the first time ever, experiments with the psychoanalytical method of his teacher, Sigmund Freud. Jung also begins an affair with his patient and thus is born a sweeping story of love and passion. Sabina Spielrein eventually becomes a psychoanalyst herself, founding the famous White School, and dies in 1942, a victim of Nazi violence. The investigation of this dramatized story is taken up by Marie, a young French scholar, and Fraser, a historian from Glasgow, as they follow Sabina's life from Zurich to Moscow to Rostov, leading to the discovery in 1977 of missing portions of the original correspondence in the form of letters between Jung, Freud and Spielrein.

The Soul Keeper 2002 part 1/6 - https://youtu.be/dHwgPS2QHkw

The Soul Keeper 2002 part 2/6 - https://youtu.be/TTzzncVAfzs

The Soul Keeper 2002 part 3/6 - https://youtu.be/PAMPn-NX6Ow

The Soul Keeper 2002 part 4/6 - https://youtu.be/QWY09r0_JrM

The Soul Keeper 2002 part 5/6 - https://youtu.be/occs1hSds-c

The Soul Keeper 2002 part 6/6 - https://youtu.be/zc8a7hRmfYE

Some more readings relevant to this conference topics:

Balint, E. (1993). Before I was I: Psychoanalysis and the imagination. Collected papers. London: Free Association Books.

Balint, E. (n.d.). The girl on the roof, or Listening to strangers (unfinished and unpublished).

Brennan, B. W. (2009). Ferenczi's Forgotten Messenger: The Life and Work of Izette de Forest. American Imago, 66(4), 427-455.

Brennan, B.W. (2015). Out of the archive/ Unto the couch: Clara Thompson’s analysis with Ferenczi. In S. Kuchuck & A. Harris (Eds.), The Legacy of Sandor Ferenczi: From Ghost to Ancestor (pp.77-95). New York, NY: Routledge.

Brennan, B.W. (2015). Decoding Ferenczi’s Clinical Diary: Biographical notes. American Journal of Psychoanalysis, 75, 5-18.

DiAmbrosio, P.E. (2014). Patient and analyst in crises: A mutual transformation reflected in a clinical narrative and St. Exupery’s The Little Prince. International Journal of Psychoanalytic Self-Psychology, 9(2), 131-143.

Dupont, J. (2002). Excerpts of the correspondence of Michael and Alice Balint with Olga, Ladislas, and Judith Dormandi. American Journal Psychoanalysis, 62(4), 359-81.

Ferenczi, S.; Dupont, J. (Ed.) (1995). The Clinical Diary of Sandor Ferenczi. [Translated by M. Balint & N. Jackson.] Harvard University Press.

Frank, K. A., & Bernstein, K. (2014). Reply to James L. Fosshage: Therapeutic action and self psychology. Psychoanalytic Perspectives, 11(1), 7-13.

Kuchuck, S. (2014). Clinical implications of the psychoanalyst’s life experience: When the personal becomes professional. (Relational Perspectives Book Series). New York: Routledge.

McGuire, W. (Ed.) (1974). The Freud/Jung letters: The Correspondence between Sigmund Freud and CG Jung. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Sklar, J. (2012). Regression and new beginnings: Michael, Alice and Enid Balint and the circulation of ideas. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 93(4), 1017-1034. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-8315.2012.00559.x.

Spielrein, S. (1995). Destruction as cause of becoming. Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought, 18, 85–118.

van Waning, A. (1992). The works of pioneering psychoanalyst Sabina Spielrein. International Review of Psychoanalysis, 19, 399–413.

 


     2015 Annual Conference: On Guilt, Conscience, Regret, and Reparation.

Date & time: Sunday, February 22, 2015 (9:30 am - 4:30 pm)

Presenters: Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler and Dr. Donald Carveth

Location: Ukrainian East Village Restaurant, 140 2nd Ave (@ 9th Street), NY, NY

Earn 4.5 CE / post-graduate education credits!

What is it about?

What is guilt - as a phenomenon, as a defense, as a transformative existential experience? What is conscience?  What is “psychic regret?”  What is reparation?  Why are we bringing the subject of guilt back onto the psychoanalytic arena at a time when guilt was left backstage by many psychoanalytic theorists and practitioners? At this conference, Dr. Carveth and Dr. Kavaler-Adler will face their overlapping concerns and the dialectic of contrasts between their views on these topics.

Dr. Carveth, in his book The Still Small Voice: Psychoanalytic Reflections on Guilt and Conscience (Karnac, 2013), deconstructs Sigmund Freud in his own way, while acknowledging the major contributions of Melanie Klein to understanding the difference between true guilt and the persecutory attacks of a primitive superego.  Dr. Kavaler-Adler, in her 2013 Karnac book The Anatomy of Regret: From Death Instinct to Reparation and Symbolization Through Vivid Case Studies, contrasts neurotic and existential guilt and minds the riches of Melanie Klein and her own theory of developmental mourning to illustrate the profound personality and relationship transformations that can emerge from an authentic and vividly conscious look at one’s own regrets. These regrets involve facing truth and all modes of its evasion, despite the painful grief, loss, and terror involved. Our own aggression becomes part of the process in which the losses and the regrets can be mourned. 

   Dr. Donald Carveth: Conflict between Superego and Conscience in Patients and Therapists.

Although Freud mostly conceived guilt as aggression turned against the self in the form of a punitive superego, in a few places he also recognized but did not emphasize the guilt arising from ambivalence prior to superego formation. This is the guilt that arises when one hates someone one also loves (a whole object) that Melanie Klein made central to the depressive position. In addition to punitive or persecutory guilt and shame, the Kleinians distinguished the depressive or reparative guilt and anxiety arising from what Winnicott called "the capacity for concern." In "The Anatomy of Regret" Kavaler-Adler (2013) associates working through the depressive position with facing one's regrets for the real and imagined damage done to the self and others. In "The Still Small Voice" (Carveth, 2013) I argue that while persecutory guilt is the province of the superego fuelled by hate, reparative guilt, to which I now add regret, are generated by the conscience fuelled by love.  

The frequent conflict between superego and conscience was obscured by Freud's decision to subsume the latter (along with self-observation and the ego-ideal) into the superego. In addition to making it difficult to conceptualize such conflict, this decision obscured recognition of the ways in which self-punishment (superego) serves to defend against reparative guilt and regret (conscience), for people often prefer to indulge in orgies of self-torment rather than acknowledge wrongdoing and move toward repentance and reparation. In the present paper, I will offer a range of clinical vignettes that illustrate the conflict between superego and conscience in the minds of both patients and therapists. Understanding of such conflict is of particular relevance in the training of therapists and in the understanding of boundary violations, impasses and stalemates, and other problems and issues of therapeutic technique.

   Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler: The Road to Loving the Other and to Meeting the Symbolic Other Within the Internal World.

In my presentation, I will focus on the interactive role of D. W. Winnicott’s theories and the theories of Melanie Klein, in the overall dimension of making existential guilt possible. Winnicott looked at how the therapist who can “survive” the most primitive aggression allows for a core true self connection, while Klein was the first to speak of reparative mourning as a clinical and developmental process.  In keeping with my integration of Winnicott and Klein, my 2014 Karnac book The Klein-Winnicott Dialectic: Transformative New Metapsychology and Interactive Clinical Theory demonstrates how such complementary theories form a fundamental clinical dialectic for working with those with primal trauma, and for engaging with all patients in a truly developmental journey towards existential guilt, and thus towards core self transformation and integration. I will offer intensely alive clinical examples that are more fully illustrated in two of my other books, Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change: A New Object Relations View of Psychoanalysis (Routledge 2003, NAAP Gradiva Award 2004) and The Anatomy of Regret: From Death Instinct to Reparation and Symbolization in Vivid Case Studies (Karnac, 2013).

Bios of the presenters:

Donald Carveth, PhD - Emeritus professor of sociology and social & political thought, senior scholar, York University; training and supervising analyst, Canadian Institute of Psychoanalysis; director, Toronto Institute of Psychoanalysis; past editor-in-chief, Canadian Journal of Psychoanalysis/Revue Canadienne de Psychanalyse; author of The Still Small Voice: Psychoanalytic Reflections on Guilt and Conscience (London: Karnac, 2013). Many of Dr. Carveth's publications are available on his website: www.yorku.ca/dcarveth .

Susan Kavaler-Adler, PhD, ABPP, D.Litt, NPsyA - Co-Founder, Executive Director, and Senior Faculty & Training Analyst and Supervisor of the ORI since 1991. For more information, please visit Dr. Kavaler-Adler's web site at www.kavaleradler.com .


2014 Annual Conference: PSYCHOANALYSIS TODAY: OBJECTIFIED DIGITAL MINDS AND LOST HEARTS ON THE CYBERCOUCH

        

Date: Sunday, February 23, 2014 - 9:30am - 4:30pm

Location: Ukrainian East Village Restaurant, 140 2nd Ave (@ 9th Str.), NY, NY

Presenter - Dr. Margaret Yard

Discussants - Dr. Ruth Danon and Dr. Jeffrey Lewis

Moderator - Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler

Recent research on the effects of an increasingly quantified lifestyle related to the digital revolution has surfaced showing some evidence affecting function and quality of life, such as increased fragmentation, decreased attention spans, increased reaction times, dissociations, increased multitasking, less eye contact, and poverty of mentalization and reflectivity.   Much of this is posited in the paradigm change of a cyberculture within which increasingly all generational groups are spending greater time with computers and digital devices than with people. 

On one hand, there is a call for psychotherapists and psychoanalysts to understand this new paradigm, while working with and addressing the problems and stressors of the patients who are adapting to high-paced life styles and challenges. On the other hand, we need to understand and to cope with technology changes affecting our own practices and life styles. 

Dr. Yard will query this fairly new phenomenon of the CYBERCOUCH in terms of what object relations digitalized represents.  Is it an extension or a mutation of traditional concepts of the internal world being played out between the self and the object? In situations of singularity, where ‘on-line’ and ‘off-line’ life is merged, or in the post-personal world, where everything is non-private and transparent, - does it enhance playful expressive conditions? This conference will explore those conditions which mediate personal and social object relations through the roles of avatars, phantom limbs and life experience, sensor powered experiences, and tailored exchanges.

In the end, however, we query the human heart and its survival within digitalized contexts.  In the end, we query the survival of deep relational human life and it's prerequisites of feeling and attachment.

Our afternoon program will include the extensive panel-audience discussion, as well as dramatization of such new CYBERCOURCH syndromes of the “Internet overload,” “fear of missing out,” or FOMO; “Internet addiction,” etc.

 

BIOs:

 

Margaret Yard, PhD, APRN, BC - Asst. Professor, Lehman College, CUNY, Faculty, Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, Alumni Program in International Trauma Studies, Columbia University, Alumni Adult Psychoanalytic Program and Analytic Group Therapy Programs, Post Graduate Center for Mental Health, Past President Post-Graduate Psychoanalytic Society, Co-Chair Educational and Training Programs, Faculty for Psychoanalytic Training, Object Relations Institute and Washington Square Institute. She is a faculty and training supervisor for Chinese American Psychoanalytic Association (CAPA) and teaches psychoanalysis in Beijing and Singapore. She is a Chair of the Province Review Board for Dominican Fathers and Brothers of the Affirming and Protecting Children and Young People Program as well as consultant for contemplative monastic communities for nuns in the Dominican Order of the Catholic Church. Read more about Dr. Margaret Yard HERE.

For more information about the conference - please write to Dr. Inna Rozentsvit, ORI Administrator, at admin@ORINYC.org or call 646-522-1056.

Is this seat taken?

No.

May I sit down?

Sure.

Is that interesting? Well…

Cyberspace, huh?

Yes.

Ever wondered if we were in it?

I beg your pardon.

Do you think we are, you know, inside it?

Literally?

Well, we wouldn't know, would we?

We wouldn't know what?

We wouldn't know we were inside it or not.

Why not?

That tree over there could be a cyberimage.

I don't think so.

But you can't say you know this for sure.

I have no problem saying I know it for sure.

A man with no doubt?

I didn't say that.

Well how can you be certain we are not cyberpeople?

I would know by now.

How would you know?

I would have found out.

How?

This is a silly conversation.

Actually, it is rather philosophical.

I have never liked philosophy.

- 7 -

So, you wouldn't even care to know if you actually exist or not.

I didn't say that.

Perhaps you aren't equipped to think this out.

That's nonsense.

Well, what form of knowledge do you use to think?

My intuition.

What's that?

My sense of things.

Your sense of things?

Yes.

What if your sense of things was that you were an onion.

What?

What if you felt you were an onion?

That's preposterous.

No, it's simply evidence of an intuition.

But it's stupid.

But if you were an onion it would be correct.

But I am not an onion.

How do you know you're not an onion?

Because I don't feel like one.

How would you know how it felt to be an onion?

Because if I were an onion I would know.

You are claiming that an onion is conscious of itself?

I didn't say that.

Well you did.

No I did not.

I'm sorry, but you said you would know if you were an onion.

I would feel it.

How could you feel you were an onion without thinking?

Maybe I would bring tears to my eyes.

No, I think you would bring tears to my eyes.

If I were an onion, I would be a human onion.

A human onion?

Of course.

How could you be both human and an onion at the same time?

Well you brought up cyberspace.

And?

I could be both human and cybercreature.

I don't think so.

Why not?

- 8 -

Because that's not possible.

I thought anything was possible.

Where'd you get an idea like that?

Well, why not?

That's irresponsible thinking.

I thought you were a philosopher.

I'm not, but what has that to do with this?

You chastened me for not liking philosophy.

One must think philosophically.

Isn't this a philosophical question?

It is not proper philosophy.

Why not?

It's just a loose idea.

What's that?

It's an idea without thought.

How is that possible?

It hasn't been thought through.

Why is it not a thought?

To qualify as a thought it has to go through thinking.

How do you know this?

My training.

As what?

I am a thinker.

How do you know that?

It comes with being me.

And me?

You disown philosophy.

You said you are not a philosopher.

But I believe in it.

So?

If you believe in something it licenses you.

To do what?

In my case, to be a thinker.

That's crazy.

If you believe you are an onion you have certain licenses.

Such as?

You could claim vegetable knowledge.

What's that?

The knowledge a vegetable possesses.

But they don't think!

- 9 -

Not like you or I, but they think vegetably.

Why would I want to think like a vegetable?

It would bring you certain advantages.

Such as?

Much of the earth is vegetation.

What could I do with this knowledge?

You could vegetate.

That's a curse.

You don't appreciate the art of vegetation?

You are diminishing me.

To vegetate is to meditate.

Vegetation meditation?

Like Zen.

I can Zen it?

If you get into vegetation.

Is this a virtual conversation?

It could be.

Because I don't feel there is anything real about this.

I don't think y shou wor y.

What is happening?

Th th ng a out cy sp ce.

What is happening to your wording?

I bevet at I my

What is happening to your nose?

I dot watt

You are disappearing.

Hello?

Hello?

 

- 10 -

Article Citation: Bollas, C. (2007). Cyberspace. Psychoanal. Rev., 94:7-10


  2013 Annual Conference: Countertransference, Regret, Aggression, and Their Vicissitudes

Date: Sunday, February 10, 2013 - 9:30am - 4:30pm

   Keynote paper presentation by Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler:

Countertransference, Regret and Aggression: Dramas and Free Associations in the Object Relations Therapy Group

In this keynote paper, Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler shares her experience and observations related to countertransference, free associations, and psychic regrets in the environment of the long-term object relations psychotherapy group. Psychic regret involves the conscious ability to face the grief related to existential guilt and to communicate the nature of one's guilt to oneself, and often to another within the personal relationship. Such psychic regret and its integration of split-off aggressive aspects of the personality also promote the development of self-agency, self-reflection, and psychic dialectic helping to resolve conflicts over love and hate.

Dr. Kavaler-Adler has dealt with the topic of psychic regret in her recent  Karnac Press book, Anatomy of Regret: From Death Instinct to Reparation and Symbolization in Vivid Clinical Cases.  In this book, Dr. Kavaler-Adler explores the profound transformational personality changes that can come about when patients consciously confront their own regrets in treatment, especially in a treatment that involves a mourning process (Kavaler-Adler’s “developmental mourning”) within a psychoanalytic treatment, and which thus addresses transference constellations. 

In this conference paper, Dr. Kavaler-Adler goes one step further to offer a personal clinical experience in which she became intensely aware of her own countertransference regret. This regret then enabled her to work with the aggression in a group therapy situation, so that insight about projections and transferences in the group became possible.  So Dr. Kavaler-Adler offers us a view of the transformational value of mournful grief in relation to regret, and now of regret in the countertransference.   She further offers us a view of these conscious attempts to grapple with regret, and to learn from regret faced consciously in a group psychotherapy setting, where  psychic visualization and a focus on the individual developmental mourning process of each member of the group, facilitates work with disowned aggression, and specifically with mother/daughter conflict. Such work leads to deeper and more self reflective work in the monthly four hour intensive group.  Her paper will show the process of the psychoanalyst’s role in engaging with the group to facilitate group communication and growth once she herself is clear about the countertransferential regret that she needs to learn from as a group leader and as a psychoanalyst.   

Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler’s paper will be accompanied by the discussion from a well known psychoanalytic author and clinician, Dr. Jeffrey Rubin.  Dr. Rubin will bring together the themes of "countertransference regret" with his own view of learning through failure in psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy. 

    Discussion by Dr. Jeffrey Rubin: Regret, Failure, and the Hidden Value of Crisis

In “Regret, Failure, and the Hidden Value of Crisis,” Dr Rubin will use Dr. Kavaler-Adler's courageous examination of her counter-transference and regret in group psychotherapy as a jumping off point to explore his understanding of the sources of the intersubjective disjunction in the treatment Dr. Kavaler-Adler describes. He will then share how he’d approach the clinical material. In the concluding section Dr. Rubin will reflect on the potential value of failure and crisis in psychoanalysis. Both can lead to transformation and growth if pursued with integrity, clarity and compassion.

 

 

   Conference Moderator: Dr. Margaret Yard

Susan Kavaler-Adler, PhD, ABPP, NPsyA, D.Litt is the Founder and Executive Director of the Object Relations Institute since 1991. She has over 35 years of experience as the clinical  psychologist and psychoanalyst, group therapist, psychoanalytic training supervisor; psychotrauma, developmental mourning, grief, and self-sabotage specialist. Dr. Kavaler-Adler works with individuals and groups. Her monthly therapy group is open for 18 years now, and it focuses on developmental mourning process. The other two groups are dedicated to the clinical supervision process, and a new group - on creative writing and blocks to creativity. Dr. Kavaler-Adler is a prolific author - she had published three psychoanalytic books with Routledge and 60 peer-reviewed articles and edited book chapters. Her two new books, The Anatomy of Regret and The Klein-Winnicott Dialectic are being published by Karnac in 2013. Dr. Kavaler-Adler received 11 awards for psychoanalytic writing, including the National 2004 Gradiva award for her book Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change. Dr. Kavaler-Adler is the object relations theorist who had integrated and developed further ideas of the British object relations clinicians and thinkers. Visit www.KavalerAdler.com – for more information on upcoming events, groups, and consultations.

Jeffrey B. Rubin, PhD practices psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically-oriented psychotherapy in New York City and Bedford Hills, New York. The author of Psychotherapy and Buddhism; The Good Life; and A Psychoanalysis for Our Time, Dr. Rubin has taught at various universities and psychoanalytic institutes including Union Theological Seminary, The Postgraduate Center for Mental Health, The C. G. Jung Foundation of New York, The American Institute for Psychoanalysis, and Yeshiva University. A Dharma Holder in the White Plum Sangha and Red Thread Zen Circle and the creator of meditative psychotherapy, Dr. Rubin is considered one of the leading integrators of the Western psychotherapeutic and Eastern meditative traditions. He runs private study groups on dreams and meditation and meditation and psychotherapy and lectures around the country on two recent books, The Art of Flourishing, and Psychotherapy and Meditation: Partners in Healing. Dr. Rubin is a training and supervising analyst at the Westchester Institute for Training in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy and can be contacted through his website (www.drjeffreyrubin.com ).

Margaret Yard, PhD, APRN, BC - Asst. Professor, Lehman College, CUNY, Faculty, Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, Alumni Program in International Trauma Studies, Columbia University, Alumni Adult Psychoanalytic Program and Analytic Group Therapy Programs, Post Graduate Center for Mental Health, Past President Post-Graduate Psychoanalytic Society, Co-Chair Educational and Training Programs, Faculty for Psychoanalytic Training, Object Relations Institute and Washington Square Institute. She is a faculty and training supervisor for Chinese American Psychoanalytic Association (CAPA) and teaches psychoanalysis in Beijing and Singapore. She is a Chair of the Province Review Board for Dominican Fathers and Brothers of the Affirming and Protecting Children and Young People Program as well as consultant for contemplative monastic communities for nuns in the Dominican Order of the Catholic Church. Read more about Dr. Margaret Yard HERE.


2012 Annual Conference: Voyages Into the Internal World: Archetypes, Internal Objects, and Internal Saboteurs.  Three Ways of Looking at Self-sabotage (with Jungian, Kleinian, and Fairbairnian Perspectives)

When: February 25th, 2012 (9:30am-4:30pm):   

Where: Lafayette Grill, 54 Franklin Street, New York, NY 10013-4009

Moderator: Dr. Jeffrey Lewis

Presenters: Dr. Michael Vannoy Adams – Jungian perspective; Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler – Kleinian Perspective; Dr. Jack Schwartz – Fairbairnian perspective

Presenters:                                                                                                                 Moderator:

                                                     

Michael V. Adams    Susan Kavaler-Adler    Jack Schwartz                                Jeffrey Lewis

Perspectives of:

                      

       Karl Jung              Melanie Klein           Ronald Fairbairn

This conference proposes to offer three profound theoretical and clinical perspectives on the collisions, collusions, and polarizations in our internal psychic world, that impede personal and communal evolution and growth.  Commonalities, overlaps, and differentiating diversities of the three overarching clinical and theoretical perspectives will be discussed by our three distinguished presenters, senior training analysts, supervisors, seasoned clinicians, and authors – Drs. Michael Adams, Susan Kavaler-Adler, and Jack Schwartz, with thought-provoking  introductions by our conference moderator, Dr. Jeffrey Lewis. Grounding it all in the clinical and existential moment, will be the linking theme among the three avenues of thought, - the ever complex theme of self-sabotage that affects each and every one of us each day! 

 

Our Presenters and Their Titles:

OPENING REMARKS - Dr. Jeffrey Lewis

"All three of the papers to be heard today, representing 3 major theoretical departures from the fixed and calcified Freudian drive theory, attempt to answer the aforementioned dilemma of how a supposedly pleasure-seeking, pain avoiding ego, results in such ubiquitous individual suffering and misery". 

Bio: Jeffrey Lewis, PhD – psychoanalyst in full-time independent private practice, Ferenczi scholar, Editorial Board of the American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Faculty and Board Member of the Object Relations Institute, and Associate Clinical Professor in the doctoral program at St. John’s University.

THE ARCHETYPE OF THE SABOTEUR: SELF-SABOTAGE FROM A JUNGIAN PERSPECTIVE - Dr. Michael Adams

Are “objects” and “archetypes” just different names for the same thing?  To answer this question, Jungian psychoanalyst Michael Vannoy Adams will analyze the function of sabotage in the psyche.  He will define what object relations psychologists mean by the “internal saboteur,” discuss the saboteur as a “bad object,” and then interpret, from a Jungian perspective, a dream that explicitly features the archetype of the saboteur.        

“There is no entry for “saboteur” in the index to the Collected Works of Jung (or, for that matter, in the index to the Standard Edition of Freud).  I know of no occasion when Jung so much as mentions the saboteur.  Sabotage is, however, a typical situation in life, and, in that respect, the saboteur is what Jung means by an archetype.   

…There are important similarities between object relations psychoanalysis and Jungian psychoanalysis, and there are important differences.  Some differences are theoretical and practical, while other differences are terminological.  Object relations psychoanalysis emphasizes objects, while Jungian psychoanalysis emphasizes images.  In a sense, what object relations psychoanalysis calls “objects,” Jungian psychoanalysis calls “images” – among them, “archetypal images.”    

Bio: Michael Vannoy Adams, DPhil., LCSW is a Jungian psychoanalyst in New York City.  He has been a faculty member and supervisor at the Object Relations Institute since 1993 and was a board member from 1997 to 2005.  He is a clinical associate professor at the New York University Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis, a faculty member at the Jungian Psychoanalytic Association, and a faculty member at the New School, where he was previously associate provost.  He is the author of three books – The Mythological Unconscious, The Fantasy Principle: Psychoanalysis of the Imagination, and The Multicultural Imagination: “Race,” Color, and the Unconscious, as well as more than 40 journal articles and book chapters.  He is the recipient of three Gradiva Awards from the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis.  He has been a Marshall scholar in England and a Fulbright senior lecturer in India. 

THE KLEINIAN PERSPECTIVE ON SELF-SABOTAGE: A LOOK AT THE INTERNAL WORLD AND ITS INTERNAL OBJECTS - Susan Kavaler-Adler

“In between the external world of interpersonal relations and the inchoate visceral and mental self we are born with, is the internal world of self and other enactments that are played out in our whole psychophysical being.  These dynamic internal objects are often confused with external others who we project them onto, often reacting to our experience of others only through the internal dramas perpetuated from earliest infancy and childhood that are played out in our minds. 

When we wake up from the subliminal confusion of projection and introjection, we become "interpreting subjects" (Ogden, 1986), who realize we are always subjectively creating meanings out of our reactions to others outside of us.  These meanings we create become interwoven with our beliefs and assumptions from those who we live with inside ourselves as dynamic "phantasy" (Kleinian spelling) objects.  I will be speaking of how we are all waking up from a coma to confront others in external reality, who we both long to connect with, but also fear at the same time. 

Unlike Fairbairn who thought internal objects were merely internally designed replicas of our primal external mother and parents, and distinct from but harmonious with Jung, who addressed innate archetype personifications in our collective unconscious psyche, Melanie Klein brought us into the overlapping realm of innate predispositions to engaging with others that become “phantasy”- internal others, our internal objects, and the coloration of these internal phantasies by our external experiences with others, which become more related to the external reality of others with time and development.  From a Kleinian perspective, just as our internal objects are colored by encountering external others, so too are external relationships perpetually colored by the subjective internal world of feelings.  Such feelings emerge from instinctive impulses interpenetrating internal object s and their representations, and are always linked to our interpretations of our experience of those others outside, whom we encounter and gradually learn to love.  We learn to love through awakening to distinctions between others outside our internal worlds and those dynamic phantoms within us, finding others separate from ourselves, who we discover are always interpreted by us through our internal object world, but who have an agency and vitality outside of that internal world. Eventually we also mourn loss and disappointment related to those we love, and thus we evolve the fabric and substance of our own authentic beings, distinct from personas or images with fallacious mystiques."

Dr. Kavaler-Adler will illustrate this with a clinical case vignette spoken out as a narrated story.  She will then conclude with theoretical formulations, integrations, and intuitions.

Bio: Susan Kavaler-Adler, PhD, ABPP, NPsyA, D.Litt is a Founder and Executive Director of the Object Relations Institute (www.orinyc.org)/ Psychologist/ Psychoanalyst/ Group Therapist/ Psychoanalytic Training Supervisor/ Psychotrauma, Developmental mourning, Grief, and Self-sabotage Specialist/ Psychoanalytic Author (of five books and 60 peer-reviewed articles) & Theorist. Visit www.KavalerAdler.com – for more information on upcoming events, groups, and consultations with Dr. Kavaler-Adler.

DYING TO BE SEEN: FAIRBAIRN'S ENDOSCOPIC SYSTEM AND THE SELF-SABOTEUR - Dr. .Jack Schwartz

Late Jeff Seinfeld once said to me that Fairbairn taught us that we as individuals have a need to be "seen" for who we are. Unlike Klein, Fairbairn made the radical departure from Freud's drive theory and placed the need to search and relate to others as the fundamental motivational drive. And in only the context of that interpersonal field do we establish internal object relational paradigms that organize our sense of self and capacity to engage the world, in both healthy and non-healthy ways.  The case that will be mentioned involves a young man, tormented by inner saboteurs, internalized at a young age and later reinforced throughout his life, and through his search to be "seen" and related to at his most vulnerable level, enabled him to move his life forward beyond all expectation.  

"Fairbairn developed a theory of endopsychic structure that completely reformulated psychoanalytic theory. In other words the outside experienced is internalized and structured into psychological affective constructs or components which in turn are then expressed within the context of a relational experience, and between the aspects of the components themselves. Thus, instead of seeing relationships as the result of drive discharge, tension reduction, his theory saw self-expression in the context of relational paradigms, specifically he postulated the inherent human drive is to form relationships, make connections, as the foundation of all psychic functioning..."

Bio: Jack Schwartz, LCSW, PsyD, NCPsyA  graduated from the New Jersey Institute for Training in Psychoanalysis, where he is a faculty member, lecturer and control analyst. He is a NAAP Nationally Certified Psychoanalyst, Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Certified Clinical Mental Health Counselor. He holds degrees from Fairleigh Dickinson University Yeshiva University (where he received the Distinguished Graduate Student Award) and International University. He served as the Senior Forensic Psychologist in Passaic County New Jersey for over 15 years, specializing in criminal investigations, probation, child custody issues, and has regularly served the court as an expert witness.  Dr. Schwartz maintains a full private practice in Northern New Jersey, working with children, adolescents, couples and adults. He frequently lectures on dream analysis, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Resilience and other matters related to the practice of psychoanalytic psychotherapy.  He is a regular contributor to the New Jersey Institute Viewpoints newsletter, and is the editor for the NJ Clinical Social Worker highly regarded newsletter, the Forum.  Dr. Schwartz has written both short fiction, and technical articles on Dream Analysis and Holocaust Survivors, and has published a psychoanalytic novel, Our Time is Up, available on Amazon, soon to be an e-book.

***

 

Invitation to the Voyages into the Internal World:

Jungian, Kleinian, and Fairbairnian Perspectives on Self-Sabotage

By Inna Rozentsvit, ORI Press Editor

 

“For all of us there will be those irreconcilable injuries and humiliations that persist and infiltrate into adult existence. They may become the seeds for those monotonous repetitions of hurting others and getting hurt ourselves,... or the leftover traumas can be incentives for innovation and change,... the opportunity to rewrite the scripts, introduce a few new characters, get rid of one or two, perhaps even change the ending, and free the lover and jester inside us all. It didn't take elaborate experiments to deduce that an infant would die from want of food. But it took centuries to figure out that infants can and do perish from want of love” (Louise Kaplan, 1984)

                This is a report on a fascinating conference which took place on February 25th, 2012 at the Object Relations Institute, on the topic so modern and so ancient at the same time – the topic of self-sabotage. This report is compiled of the excerpts of all conference presentations, as it is intended to offer everyone the first-hand experience of this event.

                Jeffrey Lewis, PhD (our conference host and moderator): Opening Remarks.

“I AM my own worst enemy… I can’t seem to get out of My Own wayI give great advice to others, but can’t do the same for MyselfHow many times have you heard some variant of this (kerfuffle) expressed by a sincere yet perplexed patient confessing the hardest contest of all…the Golden Gloves boxing championship with oneself? This entire potentiality is mind-boggling - how can our psychological apparatus allow for the phenomenological experience of you harboring a stowaway, a stranger having gained access to your boat. A free-rider, not on the passenger registry, having passed security checks and now aboard in the cargo hold…ONLY, you are both the stowaway and the ship!”

                Michael Vannoy Adams, DPhil., LCSW: The Archetype of the Self-Saboteur: Self-Sabotage from Jungian Perspective.

“… The internal saboteur is an internal aggressor and an internal persecutor. …For Fairbairn, the internal saboteur is not a “bad object” – or, in fact, any variety of object – but an anti-libidinal ego, the function of which is to attack the libidinal ego and, in the process, to repress objects.  …It is the ego – or more specifically, one of three egos, an aggressive, persecutory ego – that, through repression, sabotages effective relations with objects. … In this respect, the internal saboteur is an exquisitely exact image that provides an eloquently precise description of the process by which the ego represses – or, more specifically, sabotages – what the unconscious attempts to express.  The image “internal saboteur” is poetic.  It is much more vivid, vital, and evocative than the concept “anti-libidinal ego,” which is prosaic.  To me, the term “internal saboteur” is not just a rhetorical conceit.  It is a superbly expressive term that enables psychoanalysts with a sensibility for subtleties, to visualize – and not just verbalize – the nuances of a process that is integral to the psyche.    

    Jung introduced into psychoanalytic discourse the terms “introversion” and “extraversion.”  There is also, of course, “perversion.”  Sabotage is “subversion.”  To “subvert” means to “turn over from under.”  Topographically, the unconscious is a subconscious.  The unconscious is an “underconscious.”  From under the ego, the unconscious attempts to overturn the ego.  From the perspective of the ego, the unconscious is intrinsically subversive.  No wonder the ego is so anxious and so defensive.  Ultimately, the unconscious as such is a saboteur, for it attempts to sabotage – or to subvert – the partial, prejudicial attitude of the ego.    

In the psyche, what sabotages what?  Is it the ego that sabotages the unconscious, or is it the unconscious that sabotages the ego?  To the extent that the ego is an internal saboteur, it sabotages the unconscious – that is, it represses what object relations psychoanalysts call “objects” or what Jungian psychoanalysts call “images.”  Objects or images that emerge from the unconscious may also, however, sabotage the ego.  To the anxious and defensive ego, objects or images may be internal saboteurs.”  

                Robinson Lilienthal, PhD: Many Shapes of the Self-saboteur – Philosophical Reflections. 

“Over the time, the internal saboteurs take on many shapes. Early on, they disrupt our wishes, plans, and dreams. Then, they upset our lives, careers, relationships. Later, they keep us obstructed from our own true selves; they impede the development of what Freud called maturation, and what Jung called individuation. First as clues to our failures, they can later become the keys to unlocking the door to our final integral exfoliation, helping us in giving birth to the unique being each of us is.”

                Susan Kavaler-Adler, PhD, ABPP, NPsyA, DLitt: The Kleinian Perspective on Self-Sabotage – a Look at the Internal World and Its Internal Objects.

“In between the external world of interpersonal relations and the inchoate visceral and mental self we are born with, is the internal world of self and other enactments that are played out in our whole psychophysical being.  These dynamic internal objects are often confused with external others who we project them onto, often reacting to our experience of others only through the internal dramas perpetuated from earliest infancy and childhood that are played out in our minds” (Kavaler-Adler, 2012).  When we wake up from the subliminal confusion of projection and introjection, we become “interpreting subjects” (Ogden, 1986) who realize we are always subjectively creating meanings out of our reactions to others outside of us.  These meanings we create become interwoven with our beliefs and assumptions from those who we live with inside ourselves as dynamic “phantasy” objects. 

…Unlike Fairbairn who thought internal objects were merely internally designed replicas of our primal external mother and parents, and distinct form but harmonious with Jung, who addressed innate archetype personifications in our collective unconscious psyche, Melanie Klein brought us into the overlapping realm of innate predispositions to engaging with others that become phantasy internal others—our internal objects—and the coloration of these internal phantasies by our external experiences with others, which become more related to the external reality of others with time and development.  From a Kleinian perspective, just as our internal objects are colored by encountering external others, so too are external relationships perpetually colored by the subjective internal world of feelings.  Such feelings emerge from instinctive impulses interpenetrating internal objects, and their representations, and are always linked to our interpretations of our experience of those others outside whom we encounter and gradually learn to love.  We learn to love through awakening to distinctions between others outside our internal worlds and those dynamic phantoms within us, finding others separate from ourselves, who we discover are always interpreted by us through our internal object world, but who have an agency and vitality outside of that internal world.” 

                Jack Schwartz, LCSW, PsyD, NCPsyA: Dying to Be Seen – Fairbairnian  Endoscopic System and the Self-Saboteur. 

“Fairbairn developed a theory of endopsychic structure that completely reformulated psychoanalytic theory. In other words the outside experienced is internalized and structured into psychological affective constructs or components, which in turn are then expressed within the context of a relational experience and between the aspects of the components themselves. Thus, instead of seeing relationships as the result of drive discharge, tension reduction, his theory saw self-expression in the context of relational paradigms, specifically he postulated that the inherent human drive is to form relationships, make connections, as the foundation of all psychic functioning.

…It is in this place that the theology student, physician turned psychoanalyst Ronald W. Fairbairn begins - at the precipice of breaking the tie to the original object by reporting and recognizing what was happening in the consulting room... Historically, Fairbairn is mostly forgotten, repressed, and now resurrected and reconditioned into a myriad of other theories.  It is in the spirit of Jeff Seinfeld, a modern champion of Fairbairn, that allows us revisit Fairbairn and to acknowledge his place at the table, as the transitional object of theoretical individuation that frees psychoanalysis from denial and antiquated systems.” 

To request a copy of the full-conference film, please call 646-522-0387 or write to Admin@ORINYC.org.


2011 - ORI's 20th Anniversary Annual Conference

Dialectics of Mortality and Immortality: Time as a Persecutory vs. a Holding Object


When: Saturday, February 26th, 2011 (9:30am – 4:30pm)
Where: Lafayette Grill, 54 Franklin Street, New York, NY 10013-4009
Moderator: Dr. Jeffrey Lewis
Presenter: Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler
Discussants: Dr. Margaret Yard and
Dr. Jeffrey Rubin


“Now mortality could begin to have its dialectic with immortality as the moment of experiencing opened up, rather than being obviated by trenchant enactment.” (Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler)

Sometimes the analyst is called on unconsciously to open her breathing so that the analysand, lying on the couch, can open her mind, her shame, and her tremendous need for intimate self-expression to another. Opening up her breathing, she opens transitional space between herself and the patient, and this in turn opens the psychic inner interior space in the patient’s psyche and internal world. Opening psychic space then consequently opens up time, so that bound time of mortality, which we perceive with our left brains, transforms to time as infinite and eternal. We experience a sense of immortality through our right brains, and this allows for polarized sadomasochistic enactments to be transformed into
dialectical conversations and interactions. Mortality transforms to immortality through the “eternal now” moments. Projective identification transforms to Projection.

All these clinical phenomena can be seen mirrored in the dance of Argentine Tango where polarized sadomasochistic duels transform in the current day to the art of dialectical exchange through “conversation” in the moment of mutual, “It Takes Two to Tango,” expression. The follower heeds the caution of “non anticipation” just as the analyst needs to surrender “memory and desire” in the clinical session and moment, allowing a natural and organic evolution of shared experience to evolve in an inter-subjective flow that becomes the dance of psychoanalysis. Freud’s “free floating attention” and Winnicott’s capacity for play are other perspectives on this phenomenon, where life is transformed from contrived choreography to the moment-to-moment improvisation that gives life and evolving identity to all of us.

This conference will breathe life into the clinical work of all who attend and hear Dr. Kavaler-Adler’s paper on “Mortality and Immortality…” and all who engage with the dialectical interchange that the distinguished discussants on the panel will bring to the day, the unique day of the twentieth anniversary annual Object Relations Institute’s conference!

A special time will be dedicated to memories of Dr. Jeffrey Seinfeld, deep object relations thinker, scholar, and theorist, who died unexpectedly on January 25th, 2011. He was a world-renowned author, a philosopher, great teacher and mentor, and a friend to everyone in his path. Dr. Seinfeld was a full professor of the NYU School of Social work and a scientific faculty member and great supporter of the Object Relations Institute since its birth 20 years ago. Dr. Seinfeld was full of life, energy, and ideas, as he was preparing to be a discussant at this conference.

Information about the conference panel:

BIO: Jeffrey Lewis, PhD - Ferenczi scholar, reviewer for the American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Faculty & Board Member of the Object Relations Institute, and Faculty member at St. John’s University.

BIO: Susan Kavaler Adler, PhD, ABPP, NPsyA, D.LItt – Founder and Executive Director of the Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis.  She has been in practice as a psychologist and psychoanalyst for 36 years. She is recognized as a diplomate in psychoanalysis and as an experienced training analyst.  She also has an honorary Doctorate in literature, and a background in training as a dance therapist. 

Dr. Kavaler-Adler has published three books, and approximately 60 articles on object relations theory and psychoanalysis.  She is well known for her books and articles on the creative process, well-known women artists and writers, the erotic transference, the developmental mourning process, and the critical transformation related to psychic regret within mourning, as well as for her studies of the demon lover complex, fear of success, envy, fathers and daughters, and on time as an object.  She has explicated how mourning is a developmental and clinical process that is both implicit and explicit in psychoanalytic theory, from Freud through the British theorists.

Dr. Kavaler-Adler has received 11 awards for her writing. In 2004, she received the National Gradiva Award for her book Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change: A New Object Relations View of Psychoanalysis, after its publication by Routledge in 2003 Her earlier books, The Compulsion to Create: Women Writers and Their Demon Lovers, and The Creative Mystique: From Red Shoes Frenzy to Love and Creativity, were also published by Routledge in 1993 and 1996, respectively.  These two books are currently being reprinted in newly edited and newly illustrated versions.  Dr. Kavaler-Adler’s books have been translated into Korean by the Object Relations Institute in Seoul, South Korea, which was modeled on Dr. Kavaler-Adler’s original plans and curriculum in founding the New York Object Relations Institute.  In 2006, the Korean object relations institute had a three day conference on Dr. Kavaler-Adler’s theories and clinical work, entitled “Developmental Mourning Versus the Demon Lover Complex.”

“Seduction, Date Rape, and Aborted Surrender” was Dr. Kavaler-Adler’s last published journal article, published in the International Forum of Psychoanalysis journal in 2010.  Just prior, she had published an article on the modern movie “Phantom of the Opera,” and an article on “Pivotal Moments of Surrender to Mourning the Parental Internal Object,” which shows detailed case vignettes of psychological integration through a mourning process that allows for the psychic digestion of primal internal objects.  Fuller and more in-depth case illustrations are seen in Dr. Kavaler-Adler’s books, especially in Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change, and in two other books to be published: Anatomy of Regret and Klein-Winnicott Dialectic. 

In her clinical practice, Susan Kavaler-Adler has several specialties along with her general in-depth work as an individual object relations psychoanalyst and psychotherapist.  She has a monthly four-hour intensive mourning and psychotherapy group that has been running for approximately 16 years, and she has a monthly one-and-a-half hour Friday supervision group, in which both case presentations and personal sharing are welcomed in an atmosphere of intense collegial intimacy.  Dr. Kavaler-Adler uses psychic visualization to deepen the monthly therapy group process and the individual mourning process within it, and she uses role-playing in her supervision group, as well as in individual supervisory consultations. 

Her background in dance therapy and her ongoing life as an Argentine Tango dancer also allows her to be especially sensitive to enacted preverbal and nonverbal experience in the treatment room or in the room with supervisory consultations.  Acute attunement to the nonverbal allows Dr. Kavaler-Adler to help others process their internal world experiences from sensory and visceral levels while sitting with patients, often referred to as “processing projective identifications.”  In March, Dr. Kavaler-Adler will be conducting a private seminar on Wednesday mornings, with readings and practice of understanding projective-identification and processing it.  In addition, Dr. Kavaler-Adler is available for consultations on writing and creative process work, given her writing on the creative process, on artists and writers, and her own improvisational work in dance and writing.  On Sunday, March 20th, 2011, Dr. Kavaler-Adler will conduct a theoretical and experiential workshop on “Time as an Object,” which relates to her concerns with the experience of our mortality, and which is the topic of her paper today, “Dialectics of Mortality versus Immortality: Time as a Persecutory Versus a Holding Object.”  More information can be found on Dr. Kavaler-Adler’s web site www.kavaleradler.com .

BIO: Margaret Yard, PhD, APRN, BC - Asst. Professor, Lehman College, CUNY, Faculty, Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine, Alumni Program in International Trauma Studies, Columbia University, Alumni Adult Psychoanalytic Program and Analytic Group Therapy Programs, Post Graduate Center for Mental Health, Past President Post-Graduate Psychoanalytic Society, Co-Chair Educational and Training Programs, Faculty for Psychoanalytic Training, Object Relations Institute and Washington Square Institute. She is a faculty and training supervisor for Chinese American Psychoanalytic Association (CAPA) and teaches psychoanalysis in Beijing and Singapore. She is a Chair of the Province Review Board for Dominican Fathers and Brothers of the Affirming and Protecting Children and Young People Program as well as consultant for contemplative monastic communities for nuns in the Dominican Order of the Catholic Church.

In private practice in psychoanalysis, group practice, family practice, trauma and geriatrics, she was first responder on 9/11 at World Trade Center working with the American Red Cross. In geriatrics, she was guest lecturer on “How to Speak with Alzheimer’s” with The New York State Alzheimer’s Association, working with experiential groups with spouses and caretakers of Alzheimer’s patients. She developed and taught a series: “Helping the Helpers” with secondary trauma or compassion fatigue experienced by professionals and volunteers who work with trauma victims.

Dr Yard is a member of the longstanding Death Seminar at Columbia University and teaches Loss, Grief, Death and Dying to undergraduates and graduate university programs for nurses, administrators, social work and sociology students. She is a Foundation Member of the New York Zen Contemplative Care Program and is a death vigil participant for Visiting Nurse Service of New York (NYVNS). At Lehman College, CUNY, she teaches a course: Real world and Cyberspace Relationships.” She writes on the effects of science and technology on human intersubjectivity and relations, and the phenomenon of death from a Humanist and contemplative perspective. She is currently working on an article entitled “The Role of Trauma in Religious Belief, a chapter “Inequality in Care,” and a book entitled “VITALITY.”

Dr Yard is a published poet and lyricist. Her poetry may be found in “History of Silence”, 1998, and in 2010, “Death Steps” describes human struggle with illness from a social and psychoanalytical viewpoint. Recent presentations was at the Pulse of Death Now Conference at Columbia University include “Inequality in Death” 2010, and in 2008, “De-Civilization as response to Cultures of Death and Societal Trauma in the Second Millennium.” Her most recent article is “Cyberlife and the Colonization of Intersubjectivity” is published in Winter, 2010, Psychoanalytic Psychology.

She has authored book and lyrics on five operas written with composer Michael Sahl; these operas are produced and performed in New York City: “ Blood Ferry” (The Graduate Center, CUNY),  “John Grace Ranter” (directed by Tom O’Horgan at Theater for the New City); “Sally Ann-Home Sweet Home” (was performed at Greenwich House and  the Chelsea Theater Festival, Summer, 2005); “Katrina; Voices of the Lost” (its premiere was presented on April 24th, 2007 at the Spring Festival of the New York Arts Ensemble in Soho, and then - in New Orleans on this past anniversary of Hurricane Katrina). On November 13th, 2010, the premier of “Legacy: Our Time” was performed at the Greenwich House Music Institute. Legacy speaks of the terrible beauty and awful paradox of the 60’s- the dream of justice and love, and the reality of empire and violence. Her next piece in 2011 is entitled “The Death Class”. 

BIO: Jeffrey B. Rubin, PhD practices psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically-oriented psychotherapy in New York City and Bedford Hills, New York. The author of Psychotherapy and Buddhism; The Good Life; and A Psychoanalysis for Our Time, Dr. Rubin has taught at various universities and psychoanalytic institutes including Union Theological Seminary, The Postgraduate Center for Mental Health, The C. G. Jung Foundation of New York, The American Institute for Psychoanalysis, and Yeshiva University. A Dharma Holder in the White Plum Sangha and Red Thread Zen Circle and the creator of meditative psychotherapy, Dr. Rubin is considered one of the leading integrators of the Western psychotherapeutic and Eastern meditative traditions. He runs private study groups on dreams and meditation and meditation and psychotherapy and lectures around the country on two forthcoming books, The Art of Flourishing, and Psychotherapy and Meditation: Partners in Healing. Dr. Rubin is a training and supervising analyst at the Westchester Institute for Training in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy and can be contacted through his website (www.drjeffreyrubin.com ).


2010 Annual Conference: Psychoanalysis and Spirituality

When: Sunday, April 11, 2010
Where: Lafayette Grill, 54 Franklin Street, New York, NY 10013-4009
Moderator: Dr. Jeffrey Lewis
Presenters: Dr. Lewis Aron and Dr. Jeffrey Rubin
Discussants: Dr. Jeffrey Seinfeld and Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler
Dr. Lewis Aron: Going out to meet You, I found You coming toward me: Transformation in Jewish mysticism and contemporary psychoanalysis...

With its goal of enhancing and revitalizing human experience, and in its primary concern with felt meaning, significance, and purpose, contemporary psychoanalytic theory deconstructs the sharp division between religion and psychoanalysis. Freud’s Enlightenment ideal of science saw it as liberating the individual from the illusion of religion. Psychoanalysis offered Truth as replacement for regressive fantasy. Religious belief was “a lost cause,” a “childhood neurosis,” and Freud paid homage only to “Our god Logos—Reason,” arguing that religion was the only worthy “enemy.” Both science and rationality on the one hand and religion and spirituality on the other are
more complex and multidimensional than Freud envisioned. In this presentation we will consider mysticism and psychoanalysis through the lens of a personal anecdote.

BIO: LEWIS ARON, Ph.D. is the Director of the New York University, Postdoctoral Program in Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis. He has served as President of the Division of Psychoanalysis (39) of the American Psychological Association; founding President of the International Association for Relational Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy
(IARPP); founding President of the Division of Psychologist-Psychoanalysts of the New York State Psychological Association (NYSPA). He is the co-founder and co-chair of the Sandor Ferenczi Center at the New School for Social Research, and is an Honorary Member of the William Alanson White Psychoanalytic Society. Dr. Aron has
received the New York State Psychological Association (NYSPA) Distinguished Service Award and the Division of Psychoanalysis (39) Leadership Award. He holds a Diplomate in Psychoanalysis from the American Board of Professional Psychology and is a Fellow of both the American Psychological Association and of the Academy
of Psychoanalysis.

Dr. Aron is the author of “A Meeting of Minds: Mutuality in Psychoanalysis” (The Analytic Press, 1996). He is the Editor (with Adrienne Harris) of “The Legacy of Sandor Ferenczi” (TAP, 1993), the Editor (with Frances Sommer Anderson) of “Relational Perspectives on the Body” (TAP, 1998), the Editor (with Stephen Mitchell) of “Relational
Psychoanalysis: The Emergence of a Tradition” (TAP, 1999), the Editor (with Adrienne Harris) of “Relational Psychoanalysis II: Innovation and Expansion” (TAP, 2005), and the Editor (with Melanie Suchet and Adrienne Harris) of “Relational Psychoanalysis III: New Voices” (TAP, 2007). His most recent work, co-edited with Libby Henik: “ Answering a Question With A Question: Contemporary Psychoanalysis and Jewish Thought” is to be published this year by Academic Studies Press. He was one of the founders, and is an Associate Editor of “Psychoanalytic Dialogues,” and he is the series editor (with Adrienne Harris) of the “Relational Perspectives
Book Series,” published by The Analytic Press. Dr. Aron is in private practice in New York City and in Port Washington, Long Island, N.Y.

Dr. Jeffrey Rubin: Psychoanalysis and Meditation: Partners in Healing.

We live in a universe in which psychoanalysts meditate and meditators—including Buddhist teachers—avail themselves of therapy; and there is a burgeoning interest in the potential interface between them. In this presentation we’ll explore why psychoanalysis and meditation need each other—how each not only supplements
blind spots in the other, but makes it richer than if pursued alone—and how to integrate them. After exploring the way meditation cultivates heightened attentiveness, refines sensory clarity, lessens self-criticism, and increases affect tolerance; thereby deepening psychoanalytic listening; we’ll examine how psychoanalytic
understandings of unconscious communication and meaning illuminates and transforms the near-sightedness of meditation. In the concluding section, Dr. Rubin will delineate meditative psychotherapy, his own integration of meditation and psychoanalysis. Meditative exercises and clinical material will illustrate his theoretical reflections.

BIO: Jeffrey B. Rubin, PhD practices psychoanalysis and psychoanalytically-oriented psychotherapy in New York City and Bedford Hills, New York. The author of Psychotherapy and Buddhism; The Good Life; and A Psychoanalysis for Our Time, Dr. Rubin has taught at various universities and psychoanalytic institutes including Union Theological Seminary, The Postgraduate Center for Mental Health, The C. G. Jung Foundation of New York, The American Institute for Psychoanalysis, and Yeshiva University. A Dharma Holder in the White Plum Sangha and Red Thread Zen Circle and the creator of meditative psychotherapy, Dr. Rubin is considered one of the leading integrators of the Western psychotherapeutic and Eastern meditative traditions. He runs private study groups on dreams and meditation and meditation and psychotherapy and lectures around the country on two forthcoming books, The Art of Flourishing, and Psychotherapy and Meditation: Partners in Healing. Dr. Rubin is a training and supervising analyst at the Westchester Institute for Training in Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy and can be contacted through his website (drjeffreyrubin.com).

Dr. Jeffrey Lewis: Moderator

BIO: Jeffrey Lewis, PhD - Ferenczi scholar, reviewer for the American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Faculty & Board Member of the Object Relations Institute, and Faculty member at St. John’s University.

Dr. Susan Kavaler-Adler will discuss Dr. Aron’s moving presentation, and will bring a lot of clinical examples from her book Mourning, Spirituality and Psychic Change: A New Object Relations View of Psychoanalysis, which was distinguished by the National Gradiva Award (2004) of the National Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis.

BIO: Susan Kavaler Adler, PhD, ABPP, NPsyA, D.LItt -Founder, Executive Director, Senior Training Supervisor of the Object Relations Institute, Object Relations theorist in the British Object Relations tradition; author of The Compulsion to Create; The Creative Mystique; Mourning, Spirituality, and Psychic Change, and over 50 articles and book chapters.

Dr. Jeffrey Seinfeld will discuss Dr. Rubin's intriguing paper and clinical cases from the perspective of Shaolin Chan, Tai Chi, and object relations theory. He also will discuss the connection between therapeutic aspects of Buddhism and psychoanalysis, as described by Rubin.

BIO: Jeffrey Seinfeld, MSW, PhD is a Professor at The Silver School of Social Work, NYU; Author of The Bad Object; The Empty Core; Containing Terror, Rage & Despair: An Object Relations Approach to Psychotherapy; Interpreting & Holding: The Paternal and Maternal Functions of the Psychotherapist; A Primer on the Negative Therapeutic Reaction, and other books and articles. He is a Scientific Faculty member of the Object Relations Institute.


http://www.ctd.northwestern.edu/   Visit ORI's YouTube Channel, ObjectRelations2009, to view the highlights of our Annual Conferences:

       Thumbnail  2013 Conference - on Countertransference, Regret, Aggression, and Their Vicissitudes

         Self-Sabotage - from Jungian, Kleinian, and Fairbairnian Perspectives  2012 Conference on Self-Sabotage: Jungian, Kleinian,  and Fairbairnian Perspectives.  

  2011 Annual 20th Anniversary Conference on Dialectics of Mortality and Immortality: Time as a Persecutory vs. a Holding Object

2010 Annual Conference on Psychoanalysis & Spirituality

2009 Annual Conference on Eroticized Demonic Object

Visit ORI's YouTube Channel, ObjectRelations2009, to view NEW mini-video series "The Object Relations View"

Intro to the Object Relations Thinking and Clinical Technique - with Dr. Kavaler-Adler (part 1).

Projective Identification (part 2)

Time as an Object (part 3)

Self Sabotage - (part 4)

         Fear of Success (part 5)

         Mourning, Developmental vs. Pathological  (part 6)

         Bad Objects and Loyalty to Bad Objects (part 7)

         Demon-lover Complex  (part 8)

         Psychic Regret (part 9)

         Klein-Winnicott Dialectic  (part 10)

         Depression: The Object Relations View (part 11)

         Anxiety: The Object Relations View (part 12)

         Eating Disorders: The Object Relations View (part 13)

         Narcissism: The Object Relations View (part 14)

        Female Creativity and the Internal Father (part 15)

        Psychic Dialectic: The Object Relations View (part 16)

        Writing Blocks: The Object Relations View (part 17)

        Internal Editor and Internal Saboteur: The Object Relations View (part 18)

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Object Relations Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychoanalysis (Training Foundation) is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit educational organization. EIN # 133697333. Your donations are tax-deductible, while they help tremendously to keep down the costs of our training and to continue to offer free educational activities and events.




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